WINDSOR

Windsor, Connecticut's first community, was launched in 1633 when settlers sailed from Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts to establish themselves at the confluence of the Farmington and Connecticut rivers.The Indians referred to this area as Matianuck.

The Reverend John Warham and 60 members of his congregation, a church organized in England in 1630, arrived two years later, and renamed the settlement Dorchester. A final name change to Windsor was decreed in 1637 by the colony's General Court.

Its original land has been used to spin off no less than 20 other Connecticut towns, in whole or part, from Litchfield and Torrington to the west, to Tolland in the east. For approximately 100 years woolen mills and paper mills located on the (missing text)

Historically, Windsor's economy has been dominated by two pursuits: tobacco farming and brickmaking(since 1675). The first tobacco crop was planted in 1640 with seeds brought to Connecticut from the Virginia tobacco plantations.

Colonial Towns of Connecticut Links

1633

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